Erich Salomon, Marlene Dietrich in Hollywood telephones her daughter in Berlin, 1930
Erich Salomon, Marlene Dietrich in Hollywood telephones her daughter in Berlin, 1930

Erich Salomon

Marlene Dietrich in Hollywood telephones her daughter in Berlin, 1930

Erich Salomon (1886-1944) was undoubtedly one of the most important photographers of the 20th century. Even during his lifetime, Salomon – who was a qualified doctor of law and a polyglot gentleman accepted by leading politicians, cultural figures and socialites alike – experienced extraordinary success and recognition for his work as a picture reporter. The son of a bourgeois Jewish family in Berlin became the star reporter of Ullstein publishing house almost overnight in 1928, when he publicised the first of his secretly recorded law court reports. Soon afterwards, he succeeded in photographing previously unparalleled scenes from the world of political conferences.
Soon after the installation of the first transatlantic telephone cable, therefore, he was also able to photograph Marlene Dietrich at her house in Hollywood while she spoke to her young daughter in Berlin. The long-distance conversation took place at four o’clock in the morning, but the actress was persuaded to repeat the event for Salomon’s camera.
The photographic estate of the famous photo journalist Erich Salomon is one of the most extensive and prominent bodies of work in the photographic collection. It contains glass and film negatives, slides and above all vintage prints, and printed evidence and other documents concerning his life and work. The Erich Salomon Archive comprises a total of more than 10,000 photographs.

Marlene Dietrich in Hollywood telephones her daughter in Berlin, 1930
Gelatine silver print
20.4 x 24.6 cm
Acquired by the State of Berlin with funds from the Federal Home Office, Berlin 1980

© bpk / Berlinische Galerie 2011

 
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