Hannah Höch, 
Dada-Rundschau (Dada-Review), 1919
Hannah Höch, 
Dada-Rundschau (Dada-Review), 1919

HANNAH HÖCH 

Dada-Rundschau (Dada-Review), 1919

In 1919, Hannah Höch began to apply herself to the technique of photomontage, which had originated in the experimental workshop of Dada. Until the end of her life, despite her traditional art education, she continued to cut up the images she found - reproductions from the printed media - in order to recombine and remount their chopped elements.
The “Dada-Review” is the jumbled simultaneity of numerous fragments of text and images; a grotesque political kaleidoscope. In this complex cross-section through the era following the First World War, it is possible to recognise individuals such as the German President Friedrich Ebert wearing bathing trunks and, above him, the American President Woodrow Wilson dressed as an angel of peace. Caricatured and dismantled personalities, floating and tumbling parts, changing perspectives and proportions – and between all these, cut-out words and letters. Hannah Höch, the only woman among the Berlin Dadaists, assembled this early montage - a parody of the “gigantic global nonsense” - using photos from illustrated magazines, headlines and advertising slogans.

Dada-Rundschau (Dada-Review)
1919
Photomontage, gouache, watercolours on card,
43.7 x 34.5 cm
Acquired with funds from the Press Foundation “Der Tagesspiegel”, Berlin 1986

© VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2011

 

 
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